Steady As She Goes – Court Adopts Jury’s Royalty Rate for Ongoing Royalties

Following a jury verdict awarding damages for past infringement, the court and the parties have to work out what the appropriate form of relief for any future infringement will be, taking into account the availability of an injunction and the appropriate rate for any royalties applied to ongoing activity.  In a recent opinion an EDTX judge addressed the situation where no injunction was sought, no enhanced damages issue was presented, and the sole issue was what royalty rate should be applied to future activity.

Expert’s Opinions v. Court’s Claims Construction

A recurring issue in patent cases is when a technical expert’s opinion is consistent with the Court’s claims construction, and simply opines whether infringement exists under the construction, and when it is not.  A recent case provided three useful examples where an expert did – but in some cases did not – proffer opinions that were consistent with the claim constructions the jury would have to consider, or was otherwise permissible.

More EDTX Data Points on Enhanced Damages, Exceptional Case Fee Awards and Ongoing Royalties

Several recent opinions out of the EDTX provide litigants with more data points on enhanced damages – when are they appropriate and when are they appropriately set aside – on how future royalties are calculated, and and on when Section 285 awards of attorneys fees in “exceptional cases” are appropriate.  They also provide a helpful analysis of which non-taxable fees and expenses are not recoverable under Section 285.

Plausible. P-L-A-U-S-I-B-L-E. Plausible.

One day a year I have to spell things right, and today was that day.  Congratulations to our Marshall Chamber of Commerce team for pulling off the win at the annual Marshall – Harrison County Literacy Council spelling bee.  We made it past 12 other teams, and raised some good money for local literacy efforts.   As Bryan Partee said at the beginning of the competition, “when you can read, every book is a children’s book.”  I like that.  (To answer your question, they’re fire ants – Marshall’s Fire Ant Festival is just a few weeks away).

Speaking of spelling, “plausible” can be a pretty hard word, but a recent opinion by Judge Payne uses it in a sentence, and provides some guidance on when a motion to dismiss a complaint for failure to state a claim  because an assertion is not “plausible” should be denied.