Ezekiel Elliott case – update on status of injunctive relief as to arbitral finding

I wanted to provide a brief update for those interesting in recent activity in the Ezekiel Elliott case pending before Judge Mazzant in Sherman.

While the case is interesting to many due to its subject matter, the Court’s most recent order provides a helpful and potential useful analysis not just of injunctive relief, but of review of an arbitrator’s decision for “fundamental fairness.”

Ezekiel Elliott hearing concludes in Sherman

Yesterday’s hearing on whether the NFL’s six-game suspension against Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott would be enjoined or stayed has concluded, and Judge Mazzant promised the parties a ruling Friday.  But because of the timing, the NFL agreed during the hearing that the pending suspension would not start until after Sunday’s season opener, regardless of the Court’s ruling. The proceedings before Judge Mazzant in the the two and a half hour hearing focused on whether the proceedings were fundamentally unfair.  The Court will decide if 1) there is a substantial chance of success on the merits for the NFLPA and Elliott; 2) there is a substantial threat of immediate and irreparable harm for which there is no remedy of law; 3) if there is a substantial threat of greater injury from not granting the injunctive relief than from granting it; and 4) whether the injunctive relief will disserve the public interest.

Motion for preliminary injunction granted

A few weeks ago I posted on Judge Payne’s report and recommendation recommending that the plaintiff’s motion for preliminary injunction be granted. Judge Schroeder has now adopted the report and recommendation, finding that the defendant had not raised a substantial question regarding noninfringement of the asserted patents or the validity of the asserted patents. The order also found the reports conclusion consistent with other courts that had evaluated the causal nexus requirement in the context of pharmaceutical products, and that the report had identified “hallmark examples” of irreparable harm, which were “more than adequately supported by the record evidence.” The defendants were ordered to submit a brief of no more than five pages providing its position on the amount of an appropriate injunction bond within 14 days, and plaintiff was ordered to file a response within seven days after service of that brief. 216cv491 RWS Mylan Updated OA for PI